Second generation AMD Epyc processors are 7 nm and up to 64 cores

Intel has promised to launch Xeon Cooper Lake processors with up to 56 cores in 2020, but they will have to face a major rival: OMG announced the second generation of processors Epyc, focused on servers and data center applications. They are also not humble in numbers: the most advanced models in the line have 64 cores and 128 threads.

AMD Epyc

Codenamed Rome, the new AMD Epyc chips arrive two years after the launch of the first generation. They are based on Zen 2 architecture, whose main feature is the 7 nanometer manufacturing process.

Thanks to it, new processors can handle up to 23% more instructions per clock cycle (IPC) in workloads and offer up to four times more performance in floating point operations compared to Epyc chips from first Zen architecture.

The number of second generation Epyc chips is wide: there are 19 models, with their total cores ranging from eight to 64. The amount of L3 cache memory also draws attention: from 32 MB to 256 MB. The TDP varies between 120 W and 225 W.

All new Epyc processors support PCI Express 4.0 (up to 128 transmission paths) and up to 4 TB of DDR4 memory with a frequency of 3,200 MHz and eight channels.

AMD Epyc processor

AMD also highlights support for 256-bit AVX2 operations. First generation Epyc processors support up to 128 bits, so 256-bit AVX2 operations need to be divided into two parts and processed sequentially. In Zen 2 architecture, the execution is done at once.

The new Epyc chips are made up of up to eight 7 nanometer dies with eight cores each. Each die is connected to a 12 nanometer matrix for I / O positioned in the center. The AMD Epyc 7742 is the leader of the class:

Chip Cores Threads Clock (GHz) Boost (GHz) TDP (W) L3 (MB) Price (US $)
Epyc 7742 64 128 2.25 3.4 225 256 6,950
Epyc 7702 64 128 2.0 3.35 200 256 6,450
Epyc 7702P 64 128 2.0 3.35 200 256 4,425
Epyc 7642 48 96 2.3 3.3 225 256 4,775
Epyc 7552 48 96 2.2 3.3 200 192 4,025
Epyc 7542 32 64 2.9 3.4 225 128 3,400
Epyc 7502 32 64 2.5 3.35 180 128 2,600
Epyc 7502P 32 64 2.5 3.35 180 128 2,300
Epyc 7452 32 64 2.35 3.35 155 128 2,025
Epyc 7402 24 48 2.8 3.35 180 128 1,783
Epyc 7402P 24 48 2.8 3.35 180 128 1,250
Epyc 7352 24 48 2.3 3.2 155 128 1,350
Epyc 7302 16 32 3.0 3.3 155 128 978
Epyc 7302P 16 32 3.0 3.3 155 128 825
Epyc 7282 16 32 2.8 3.2 120 64 650
Epyc 7272 12 24 2.9 3.2 120 64 625
Epyc 7262 8 16 3.2 3.4 155 128 575
Epyc 7252 8 16 3.1 3.2 120 64 475
Epyc 7232P 8 16 3.1 3.2 120 32 450

It is worth noting that chips with a ‘P’ suffix are intended for motherboards with a single socket, which is why they are cheaper. The other models can work in a dual socket scheme.

Everything indicates that the fight with Intel will be good. AMD points out that the Epyc 7742 outperformed the Xeon Platinum 8280L in several benchmarks. It is true that the Intel processor is in a lower category (it comes with 28 cores and 56 threads). However, the AMD Epyc 7742 costs $ 6,950, as shown in the table above; the Xeon Platinum 8280L costs around $ 10,000.

It is no mere whim that Intel is betting its chips on the future Xeon Cooper Lake and Ice Lake chips, both families scheduled for 2020.

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